Michelle Doetsch, LMT, BS

Transformational Massage for a New You

Frequently Asked Questions

How far do I have to get undressed?
How much pain is normal during a massage?
Is it normal to hurt the day after a massage?
Will you massage my whole body or just the area that hurts?
Will massage help relieve my fibro flare?
Can you help me if I'm in the midst of a full-blown migraine?
How many sessions will it take to completely relieve my pain?
How often should I get massage, myofascial release (MFR), or reiki?
Are there any supplements that I should take to make my muscles work better or hurt less?
Do you see clients who don't have chronic pain?
Do you work on injuries like pulled muscles and tendonitis?

How far do I have to get undressed?
It depends on which service you're receiving.

Energy work: You will stay fully clothed when receiving reiki, spiritual healing, or any other type of energy work.

Myofascial release: Everyone should wear loose fitting shorts. Women should also wear a sports bra.

Massage & bodywork: You only need to undress as far as you're comfortable. That could mean just taking your shoes off, taking everything off, or something in between. I will step out of the room while  you undress, get on the massage table, and cover up with the top sheet and blanket.

How much pain is normal during a massage?
It depends on the reason you're receiving massage and which techniques are being used. I don't use any techniques which must cause pain in order to work. For most people, the "optimal therapy zone" is the point at which you feel a "good hurt." (This is the point at which it is uncomfortable or slightly painful but also feels beneficial.) If you have fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or other constant chronic pain, there is no such thing as "good hurt" for you; any pain will leave you feeling worse.

Is it normal to hurt the day after a massage?
It depends. If deep massage or bodywork was performed, it's common to have some soreness the next day that feels as if you worked out really hard the day before. If, however, you feel as if you've been hit by a bus the next day, the work performed was too deep for your body. If this happens, it's important for you to let me know right away, so we can discuss some home care you can do to reduce the soreness. It also allows me to make a note of the areas that hurt, and use different techniques the next time we meet to help ensure that this doesn't happen again.

Will you massage my whole body or just the area that hurts?
That depends on which you would like me to do. If you want a full body massage with extra work to the area(s) that hurts, that's what I'll do. Likewise, if you're looking for concentrated work for your painful area(s), I can do that too. That said, it's important to note here that the area that hurts is rarely the source of the pain, so don't be surprised if I work somewhere else as well.

Will massage help relieve my fibro flare?
it depends on the type of massage or bodywork you receive and the severity of your fibromyalgia. At the height of a flare, anything other than very light work will prolong your flare. A light massage with heat and essential oils/aromatherapy is often very effective in helping to reduce the pain of a flare.

Can you help me if I'm in the midst of a full-blown migraine?
It depends on the severity of your migraine and your individual symptoms, but it's unlikely that massage and bodywork will have any effect once the migraine is at full force. Aromatherapy is also not a viable option for most people during a migraine due to their heightened sensitivity to smell. Reiki &/or spiritual healing, however, generally won't exacerbate your migraine symptoms and can allow your body to relax and begin healing itself. That said, if your symptoms include nausea and vomiting, or will be exacerbated by going out in the sunlight or being in a moving vehicle, you should wait until the peak of your migraine has passed before making a trip to the office.

How many sessions will it take to completely relieve my pain?
It depends; many factors go into determining how long it may take to completely relieve your pain. First and foremost is how your body responds to the work we do. Stress level, stress management, trust, guarding, depth of past injuries, and complexity of your tension and pain are only a few of the other factors that must be considered in order to answer this question for each individual.

How often should I get massage, myofascial release (MFR), or reiki?
That depends on many things. The frequency with which you get massage, MFR, or reiki should comfortably fit into both your budget and your schedule. If you're stressing out over trying to find the time and/or money for your next session, you probably won't get optimal results. Other factors to consider are: how easily your body responds to the work, your current level of stress, how well you manage that stress, the intensity of your pain, and what your goals in relation to massage, MFR, or reiki are.

Are there any supplements that I should take to make my muscles work better or hurt less?
There probably are, but it is beyond the scope of a massage therapist to recommend nutritional supplements or make dietary suggestions.

Do you see clients who don't have chronic pain?
Absolutely. Besides specializing in headaches, chronic neck & shoulder pain, sciatica, chonic hip & low back pain, and fibromyalgia, I also specialize in stress reduction. So if you have stress I'm more than happy to see you.

Do you work on injuries like pulled muscles and tendonitis?
No. Injuries involve acute pain (temporary, resulting from injury or illness) which requires a different type of massage or bodywork than chronic (persistent) pain does. It is very difficult to do both well, so I have chosen to specialize in treating chronic pain conditions.


"The answer to every question is 'it depends'" ~ Proverb

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